by William Needham Finley IV™

Development Beat: Smashed on Hillsborough Street

in Development/ITBNN by

Brought to you by Rufty-Peedin Design Builders.


Week of August 28, 2017

Smash Waffles starts construction on Hillsborough Street

Two-story noodle bar planned for South Wilmington

New frat house coming to NC State’s penal colony

Historic home on Oberlin moving

Downtown Marriott preps for renovations

Zoe’s coming to North Raleigh

Waffle Delivery Coming Soon to Hillsborough Street


Smash Waffles, a Pawnee, Indiana Greenville, NC based waffle-delivery service will soon be making its way to Hillsborough Street. Work is now underway on their first Raleigh location, which will open later this year on the ground floor of The Hillsborough mixed-use development at 2304 Hillsborough. The $150,000 fit-out of the now-empty space will be handled by Culver Building Company, although Metrocon is the General Contractor for The Hillsborough development.

While the Smash Waffles’ website recommends booking those morning deliveries at least 24 hours in advance, their waffles are not the kind you’d find in your average restaurant or the Cameron Village Harris Teeter freezer aisle. Smash’s traditional Beglian-style waffles are cooked with a dough-based batter instead of buttermilk, and feature lavish toppings. Their offerings include everything from the “Cracker Jack” which is topped with “sweet caramel popcorn and dressed with a caramel & brown sugar drizzle” to “The Campfire,” topped with “a marshmallow cream sauce, Nutella drizzle, graham cracker crumbles, and powdered sugar.”

If you can’t wait for construction to wrap up before getting your hands on these waffles, you can get them at Pizza La Stella on Fayetteville Street, where they’ve featured Smash Waffles on the menu since May.


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Two-Story Noodle Bar Planned for South Wilmington

A new restaurant on South Wilmington Street next to Taz’s market would bring with it an entirely new front building facade, should an application filed with Raleigh’s Historic Development Commission win approval.

The case seeks to build a new storefront for an as-yet unnamed two-story noodle bar. The application, filed by friend of the media empire Ted Van Dyk of New City Design, states that the design is intended to “honor the Moore Square Historic District, while bringing a contemporary interpretation to the aesthetic.”

“As a restaurant and night spot,” Van Dyk notes, “appearance and attractiveness, and connection between inside and outside are important.”

The building’s original facade has been completely missing for decades and the building itself is considered a “noncontributing” resource in the Moore Square Historic District.

The new facade will be comprised mostly of glass, frosted glass and ceramic tile, and will “echo the ‘two-part’ composition of other facades on the street.”

The goal is to create something that is “clearly of the 21st century, does not copy other buildings or pretend to be old, and is instead respectful and compatible with its surroundings while establishing its own identity and place in time.”

We’re glad someone is finally doing something with this space and look forward to seeing how the project turns out, should it be granted approval.

New Frat house Coming to NC State’s Greek Penal Colony

Again, this is not a joke. These are the actual plans.

When we last checked in on the development of Greek Village at NC State, which was apparently designed by an 8th grader, a new Delta Zeta house had just received construction permits. Now, they will soon be joined by the brothers of Lambda Chi, whose $4.4 million, 17,357 square-foot house is getting built by McKinley Building. We plan to cover this Greek Village development until the very end. It’s just that fascinating.

Preserving a New Office Space

Preservation NC, a nonprofit focused on protecting and preserving historic properties and landscapes across the state, will soon be preserving some property for their own purposes: a new office.

The organization, which is currently headquartered above the City of Raleigh Museum at 220 Fayetteville, is planning to relocate to a space on Oberlin Road.

The property at 814 Oberlin is now home to the historic Plummer T. Hall House, built between 1880 and 1893 by Reverend Hall as a wedding gift to his bride. According to a certificate of appropriateness application, the Hall house is “the only one story Queen Anne cottage in the Oberlin community and has several distinct architectural details such as the turreted section of the front porch, a bay window, and both circular and quatrefoil gable vents.”

Instead of merely renovating and restoring the home, Preservation NC plans to move another historic home onto the same lot: the Willis Graves House. Currently situated down the street at 802 Oberlin, the Graves House is a two story home Built in the Queen Anne style, and was “the only residence of its kind in the historically African-American Oberlin community.”

Originally built between 1884 and 1889 for Willis M. Graves, one of Oberlin’s early settlers, the house will be relocated to 814 Oberlin, where both it and the Hall house will be placed on new foundations, and joined via a deck built between new additions on the back of each home, allowing for an accessible rear entry.

Although the additions are behind the “historic” portions of the houses, they are designed to “be compatible with the historic details and massing of both houses as well as with each other.”

The COA application, which was approved by Raleigh’s Historic Development Commission last week, notes that the additions are “meant to be simple and clean lined in order to draw your eye to the ornate and often times quirky details of the Willis Graves and Plummer T. Hall houses.”

Without Preservation NC, these buildings would be disappearing at a much quicker pace, so it seems fitting that the organization wants to headquarter itself in a place that so clearly embodies their vision.

Downtown Marriott Preps For Renovations

Two rooms on the fourth floor of the downtown Marriott at 500 Fayetteville Street will soon be turned into “model rooms” for a future renovation project at the hotel. Built just ten years ago, the hotel underwent a significant renovation in 2014 that saw the addition of a new dining area and improvements to its meeting and event spaces.

Although we’re not sure what these new rooms will look like, testing out the new design on two rooms before transforming the entire hotel seems like a pretty smart move. Marriott has redesigned the guest rooms in many of their hotels in recent years, and the results remind us more of high-end condos than standard hotel rooms, and we imagine that will be the case for the Marriott City Center.

Zoe’s Comes to North Raleigh

Zoe’s Kitchen will soon be moving into the space on Falls of Neuse occupied since 2011 by the Tribeca Tavern. The surprisingly pricey $850,000 renovation of the space is being handled by Venture Construction.

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